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Emma Cullen23 of October, 20187 mins
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How to run Town Hall meetings with Mentimeter

Planning a Town Hall meeting can be a daunting task. Such an event often has important guests and audience participation which can make for a stressful combination, but it doesn’t have to be! This article will show you how you can use Mentimeter in order to hold and moderate a successful and interactive Town Hall meeting.

Planning a Town Hall meeting can be a daunting task. Such an event often has important guests and audience participation which can make for a stressful combination, but it doesn’t have to be! This article will show you how you can use Mentimeter in order to hold and moderate a successful and interactive Town Hall meeting.

What is a Town Hall meeting?

Traditionally, Town hall meetings are held by politicians in order to share their political ideas and take questions from the audience. However, in most recent times, CEOs of large companies or other business figures have taken such meetings. Today, the concept of a Town Hall Meeting often refers to any question and answer-type event, held in front of a live audience.

Town Halls with Mentimeter

As mentioned above it is possible to run a well organized and interactive Town Hall meeting with Mentimeter. Mentimeter is designed to be used in front of live audiences and makes sure that everyone’s voice is heard through interactive presentations. With Mentimeter, audience members can use their smartphones to actively participate in the session. Let’s explore some different ways in which you can do this.

Introduction slides

As with any type of presentation, you might want to display some introductory slides. With Mentimeter you can do exactly that.

Use Quick Slides to create introduction slides without any fuss. Simply add an image of the speaker with their name, a short description or bullet points to create an introduction slide. That way your audience will be able to learn about the speakers.

Prioritize issues to talk about

At Town Hall meetings it is common that the speaker or speakers discuss, present or debate a range of different topics. One example could be political issues that the candidates of opposing parties discuss and debate. Quite often, there is simply not enough time to discuss everything on the agenda, so the issues need to be prioritized.

Use Mentimeter to prioritize the issues at the start of the meetings. Do this by using the 100 point Question Type. Here you can add the issues or discussion points and your audience can rank which issues are the most important ones to focus on. This will give you and your speaker a clear picture of which topic are most important to the audience and you can focus the discussion around them, as demonstrated in the example below:

Screen Shot 2018-10-23 at 14.17.27

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Questions from the audience

Another very important aspect of a Town Hall meeting is to make sure that your audience gets a chance to ask questions. Q&A sessions can be a logistical nightmare. In a traditional Q&A session, the moderator or an assistant needs to try to select an audience member to ask a question, and then get a microphone to them to make sure they get heard. This not only takes a lot of time, but it can also be difficult to moderate.

Mentimeter’s Questions for Audience feature enables audience members to submit their questions to the speaker using their smartphones. Learn more about this feature and avoid stressful Q&A sessions with this helpful article.

Moderation

During Town Hall meetings the moderator has an important role. It is their job to make sure that participants have space to speak and the audience is able to ask questions. Moderating such events can be a demanding job. As the moderator, you need to be able to keep control, and this can be difficult.

To keep control, use the Mentimote tool to moderate audience questions. This way you can filter out and remove any inappropriate content and select the most interesting questions for your guest to answer. Learn more in this helpful article.

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Posted by Emma Cullen23 of October, 2018
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